Docker for .Net Developers (Post #1 of 5)

This is the first post in the 5post series of Docker for .NET Developers.

What is Docker ?

In short : Docker is World’s leading Software Container Platform.

In Detail:  Docker is an open-source project that automates the deployment of applications inside software containers. Quote of features from Docker web pages:

Docker containers wrap up a piece of software in a complete filesystem that contains everything it needs to run: code, runtime, system tools, system libraries – anything you can install on a server. This guarantees that it will always run the same, regardless of the environment it is running in.

Docker provides an additional layer of abstraction and automation of operating-system-level virtualization on Windows and Linux.

Docker uses the resource isolation features of the Linux kernel such as cgroups and kernel namespaces, and a union-capable file system such as OverlayFS and others to allow independent “containers” to run within a single Linux instance, avoiding the overhead of starting and maintaining virtual machines.


To understand docker better we first need to understand the micro services architecture.

What is a microservice?

There are different definitions of microservices. If you search the Internet, you’ll find many useful resources that provide their own viewpoints and definitions. However, most of the following characteristics of microservices are widely agreed upon:

  • Encapsulate a customer or business scenario. What is the problem you are solving?
  • Developed by a small engineering team.
  • Written in any programming language and use any framework.
  • Consist of code and (optionally) state, both of which are independently versioned, deployed, and scaled.
  • Interact with other microservices over well-defined interfaces and protocols.
  • Have unique names (URLs) used to resolve their location.
  • Remain consistent and available in the presence of failures.

Microservice architecture is a method of developing software applications as a suite of independently deployable, small, modular services in which each service runs a unique process and communicates through a well-defined, lightweight mechanism to serve a business goal.

Microservice architecture, or simply microservices, is a distinctive method of developing software systems that has grown in popularity in recent years.  In fact, even though there isn’t a whole lot out there on what it is and how to do it, for many developers it has become a preferred way of creating enterprise applications.  Thanks to its scalability, this architectural method is considered particularly ideal when you have to enable support for a range of platforms and devices—spanning web, mobile, Internet of Things, and wearables—or simply when you’re not sure what kind of devices you’ll need to support in an increasingly cloudy future.

As Martin Fowler points out, Netflix, eBay, Amazon, the UK Government Digital Service, realestate.com.au, Forward, Twitter, PayPal, Gilt, Bluemix, Soundcloud, The Guardian, and many other large-scale websites and applications have all evolved from monolithic to microservices architecture.

Comparison between application development approaches ( as per Microsoft)

monolithic-vs-micro.png

  • A monolithic app contains domain-specific functionality and is normally divided by functional layers, such as web, business, and data.
  • You scale a monolithic app by cloning it on multiple servers/virtual machines/containers.
  • A microservice application separates functionality into separate smaller services.
  • The microservices approach scales out by deploying each service independently, creating instances of these services across servers/virtual machines/containers.

 

 

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